5 Most Common Long-Term Disability Claims

According to the Council for Disability Awareness, it is estimated that one out of every four Americans will find themselves diagnosed with a disability prior to retiring at the age of 65. Additional studies show that less than half of individuals and families have enough money saved to sustain their living expenses for even one month before feeling the financial strain— illustrating that a long-term disability diagnosis can not just be devastating for the individual but also financially devastating for their entire family.

In short, no one plans to become disabled. And yet, it can happen to anyone at any time and the chances of it happening only increase with age, lifestyle choices, and even the type of work we do on a daily basis.

Popular Long-Term Disability Claims

But while the majority of people may imagine someone who struggles with a long-term disability as wheelchair bound, the fact of the matter is that long-term disabilities can manifest in a host of different ways— some visible, some not.

Below are the top five long-term disability diagnosis types by category according to our own research and the CDA’s 2013 Long-Term Disability Claims Review:

  1. Musculoskeletal/Connective Tissue Disorders and Conditions

According to the CDA’s 2013 Long-Term Disability Claims Review, nearly one-third of all long-term disability claims are due to musculoskeletal and connective tissue disorders. These are best described as issues related to neck and joint pain as well as back and neck issues; muscle and tendon problems; foot, ankle and hand disorders as well.

More specifically, the following are among the most commonly diagnosed musculoskeletal and connective tissue disorders and conditions:

  • back pain
  • degenerated disk
  • arthritis
  • osteoporosis
  • rheumatism
  1. Nervous System-Related Disorders and Conditions

Most nervous system disorders are common and can be helped or managed with treatments such as physical therapy and/or medication. Nevertheless, with some being generative, working full-time or even part-time can prove extremely difficult.

Below are a few common nervous system related disorders:

  • Multiple Sclerosis (MS)
  • Alzheimer’s Disease
  • Parkinson’s Disease
  • Epilepsy and Seizures
  • Shingles
  1. Cardiovascular/Circulatory Disorders and Conditions

According to the American College of Cardiology (ACC), it is estimated that an average of one person dies every 40 seconds in America due to cardiovascular disease. But for those individuals who experience cardiovascular issues and require surgeries and rehabilitation services, the time spent recovering can have a serious impact on their livelihood— limiting them from earning a paycheck as well as increased difficulties managing day-to-day activities.

  1. Cancer and Tumors

Studies estimate that 41% of men and 38% of women will develop some form of cancer within their lifetime. And while hereditary factors and lifestyle choices can play a part in determining one’s risk factor, there is no fool-proof way of determining if or when you will be diagnosed with cancer.

If a cancer diagnosis or tumor does occur treatments such as chemotherapy, radiation, and surgeries can leave your body sick, exhausted, and bedridden among other things. During this time, it may be difficult or impossible for you to keep up with your job duties.

  1. Mental Disorders

Depression and anxiety are among the most common mental disorders that can affect one’s ability to work. Though the systems may not appear physical (though they can), mental disorders are nothing to be brushed off. If you experience lingering or worsening symptoms of depression or other mental disorders for a period of two weeks or more, talking to your doctor may prove helpful.

Most disorders can improve over time with the proper medical attention but leaving them untreated can lead to worsening symptoms that can have an effect on every facet of your life and limit you from living your best life.

Planning For The Future

Just because no one can predict the future, doesn’t mean you shouldn’t still plan for it.

When Depression Strikes And When To See A Doctor

When the air gets cooler and the trees start to lose their leaves, the holiday season is never far behind. It is a great time for family, friends, good food, vacations, and enjoying each other’s company. But what happens when you can’t seem to find your holiday spirit?

If your spirit is lacking this season, it could be a sign of something much more important.

Depression doesn’t strike when it is most convenient for you, sometimes there is a reason for it and sometimes there is not. In fact, it is not at all uncommon to develop depression symptoms during the holiday season.

But not all cases of depression are the same and therefore, it is important to know when to reach out to your doctor and discuss what you are experiencing.

Know The Signs of Depression

How do you know when you are displaying symptoms of depression?

One of the largest misconceptions regarding depression is that people who suffer from it are sad all the time and in some cases, may want to commit suicide. What many fail to realize is that depression is much more than that.

Depression is different in that it can creep up on you without you even noticing it. Symptoms that might be described as being in relation to a bad day may continue to linger for multiple days or weeks before you even realize feeling off.

According to Mayo Clinic, the most common symptoms of depression are as follows:

  • Feelings of sadness, tearfulness, emptiness or hopelessness.
  • Angry outbursts, irritability or frustration, even over small matters.
  • Loss of interest or pleasure in most or all normal activities, such as sex, hobbies or sports.
  • Sleep disturbances, including insomnia or sleeping too much.
  • Tiredness and lack of energy, so even small tasks take extra effort.
  • Reduced appetite and weight loss or increased cravings for food and weight gain.
  • Anxiety, agitation or restlessness.
  • Slowed thinking, speaking or body movements.
  • Feelings of worthlessness or guilt, fixating on past failures or self-blame.
  • Trouble thinking, concentrating, making decisions and remembering things.
  • Frequent or recurrent thoughts of death, suicidal thoughts, suicide attempts or suicide.
  • Unexplained physical problems, such as back pain or headaches.

If you should experience any of these symptoms, or a combination of them for a period of two weeks or more, it is advised to consult with your primary care physician.

5 Most Common Dental Problems And How To Avoid Them

According to American author William Arthur Ward, “A warm smile is the universal language of kindness.” Smiling is something we do instinctively as infants and something we carry with us all throughout our lives. Unfortunately for some, their smiles may not prove to be as warm and welcoming as they would hope. Problems such as gum disease, yellowed teeth, and chronic bad breath can have a negative impact when meeting new people and could be a sign of a deeper issue due to the close link between oral and overall health.

Many people learn the importance of oral hygiene at a young age. Those who don’t may face a variety of oral health problems down the road, some being scarier than others. So, what are some of the most common dental diseases?

  1. Bad Breath

While some cases of bad breath can be the result of eating foods like onions, garlic, or hard-boiled eggs, other cases may prove to be more serious. Bad breath, otherwise referred to as, Halitosis, may be something that even a good solid brushing won’t be able to fix. Halitosis can be a symptom of larger problems such as gum disease, infection, dry mouth, or even other seemingly unrelated issues like gastric reflux, diabetes, liver or kidney disease. In some instances, Halitosis may even require a trip to your doctor.

  1. Gum Disease

According to the Mayo Clinic, there are over 3 million cases of gum disease each year. And while gum disease, otherwise known as Periodontitis, may be common, that doesn’t make it any less serious. In fact, those with gum disease have a higher chance of developing diabetes, osteoporosis, heart disease and other ailments. In order to lessen your chances of developing gum disease, it is advised to practice good oral hygiene and schedule regular cleanings with your dentist, who may decide whether more preventative action is needed.

  1. Yellow Teeth

While not exactly a disease, yellow teeth can be a sign of poor oral hygiene and can, in some cases, indicate other dental issues that may be lurking just beneath the surface. Visiting the dentist once every six months for a thorough cleaning can help prevent yellowing teeth due to diet or lifestyle choices. In some severe cases, veneers may be recommended.

  1. Toothaches

A toothache should never be ignored. While some cases of a toothache may be related to minor inflammation, other cases could indicate the presence of gum disease, cavities, pulpitis, a broken tooth, or more. When confronted with a persistent toothache, the best course of action is to have a dentist find the underlying cause.

  1. Tooth Erosion

There are few substances within the human body that are stronger than our enamel. This is why everyone from our dentists to television commercials are constantly urging us to protect it — because once our enamel is gone, it cannot be brought back. The loss of enamel is referred to as tooth erosion. Soda, sugar, and some acidic foods can eat away at our enamel. In order to combat the chances of experiencing tooth erosion, brushing with a soft-bristled brush is suggested as well as reducing the number of acidic drinks consumed.

Taking Control of Your Oral Health

When was the last time you visited the dentist? Could you be at risk of developing one, or even all, of these potentially costly dental problems?

3 Signs That Your Pet Needs to Go to the Vet

It’s not always easy to tell when your pet needs to go to the vet. Some animals are masters at masking pain and other problems they may be dealing with, so you may not always know when your pet needs medical attention.

To help make things easier, we’ve compiled a list of three of the most common warning signs to look out for with your pet.

Changes in Mood or Appetite

This is one of the main indicators that a pet is not feeling well. In some cases, it could be a sign of hidden pain or illness that could require immediate veterinary attention. On the other hand, if your pet recently visited the vet and received any shots, it’s possible that their lack of appetite could be related to the vaccine. If you suspect your pet’s behavior could be medication related, it’s always best to thoroughly read over any of the literature given to you by your vet. If you still have questions or concerns, call your vet or stop by their office and they should be able to advise you if further medical attention may be needed.

Skin Lesions or Loss of Fur

Sudden changes in your pet’s coat could be a sign of a skin condition or underlying illness. Skin conditions can be the result of anything from a recent change in diet, to an allergic reaction, a fungal infection, an allergy, or even anxiety. The good news is that most skin conditions in pets are easily diagnosable and treatable.

Mobility or Sensitivity Issues

As our pets age, it’s common for them to begin experiencing some mobility issues. But if your pet is suddenly exhibiting signs of pain during playtime or while being petted, they may have injured themselves and need immediate veterinary care.

Your vet will likely be able to determine the cause of the pain and develop a plan to help your pet. Aside from an injury, mobility issues can also be linked to excess weight and even genetics. For example, larger breeds of dogs, as well as Persian, Siamese and Himalayan cats, can be prone to developing hip dysplasia as they age.

Show Your Love

Ultimately, the best way you can help keep your pet the happiest and most healthy is to take them for regular veterinary check-ups. Routine exams and bloodwork are the key to catching any problems in your pet early and treating them to help ensure no problems develop or worsen later on.

Have you recently added a new four-legged member to your family? Make sure you are getting them the same protection you would invest in for yourself. Our pets are wholly dependent on us; not just for love and attention, but also for their overall health including diet, exercise, enrichment, and regular veterinary checkups.

What You Need to Know About AD&D Insurance

When contemplating insurance needs, most people take great care in making sure they have a suitable life insurance policy and medical coverage. You might not think you need something like Accidental Death and Dismemberment coverage. As an attorney, your profession doesn’t often put you in harm’s way — you’re not building high rises or doing a physical job that comes with those inherent risks. But the truth is,  accidents still happen to people who aren’t taking great daily risks — and here’s why AD&D coverage should be considered in addition to your other insurance policies.

Protect Your Family

Life insurance still pays in the event of an accidental death, so you may wonder why you would need both types of coverage. In the case of an accident resulting in your death, an AD&D policy would provide extra coverage beyond what your life insurance policy covers. AD&D policies are typically less expensive, too, so they are a more cost effective way to increase your coverage in the event of an accident.

Know Your Needs

Another thing to consider when adding to your insurance coverage is your family’s likely need at the time — an accidental death often leaves families unprepared for the sudden loss of income and financial strain. By definition, accidental deaths are not something you can prepare for and, even with excellent life insurance, this is an event that can have long-lasting financial repercussions on the family as a whole.

Dismemberment Coverage

An additional reason you should consider an AD&D policy lies in the Dismemberment feature of the coverage. Your life insurance policy does not cover permanent injuries and your medical coverage will only aid you in paying bills associated with treating those injuries, not loss of work or any other lifestyle impairment you might suffer from a permanent disability. That is where the Dismemberment coverage can help. 

Tips to Help You Keep Your Teeth for Life

Did you know that one in four Americans over 65 have no teeth? That being said, a healthy smile can be an impressive asset! Your teeth vary in shape and size depending on where they are in your mouth. These differences allow them to do many different jobs. They help us talk, pronounce different sounds clearly and give our faces their shape! Because they are so important, it makes sense to give your teeth the best care possible. For most of us, thorough daily oral hygiene lays the foundation for a healthy smile. Just a simple routine of brushing and flossing, in addition to regular dental checkups, can be enough in most cases to help prevent tooth decay, gum disease, and bad breath.

Follow these tips to hold onto your smile!

Floss, then brush.

We have heard this our whole lives, but not many of us do it. If you floss before brushing, you remove food that is trapped in tight spots – which are major “bacteria growth” zones. Place your brush at a slight angle toward the gums when brushing along the gum line. Use a gentle touch—it doesn’t take much pressure to remove the plaque from your teeth, and a vigorous scrubbing could irritate your gums. Concentrate on cleaning all the surfaces of the teeth. To help prevent tooth decay, use a fluoride-containing toothpaste.

Good eating habits.

Many people think that having a high level of sugar in your diet is the most common reason for tooth decay. This is not true – it is how often you have sugar in your diet, not the amount. It takes up to an hour for your mouth to cancel out the acid caused by eating and drinking sugar. Give your teeth a cleanse by munching on crunchy vegetables or fruits at the end of a meal, this serves as a type of mini tooth-brushing session. The hard flesh acts as a cleanser and the chewing motion stimulates saliva production. Replace your afternoon soda with tea – tea leaves contain the tooth protector fluoride. Studies show that green tea drinkers have a lower incidence of advanced gum disease. As an added bonus, researchers believe that the catechin in green tea is more effective than mints at combating bad breath.

Take your vitamins.

Vitamin C, Calcium, Vitamin D and Omega-3 are vital for maintaining and repairing gum tissue. Everything from tooth sensitivity to receding gums can often be attributed to Vitamin C deficiency.  Calcium is crucial for strong teeth and healthy bones. Vitamin D helps maximize calcium absorption. Omega-3 or fish oil supplements can help gum tissue heal.

Watch your medicine intake.

Medicine, both prescription and over-the-counter, can often cause decreased saliva production. This is dangerous because saliva serves as a protective barrier against gum and tooth decay. When on medicine, be sure to take frequent sips of water or chew sugar-free gum to help relieve dry mouth. If this doesn’t do the trick, consult your dentist!

Regular dental check-ups.

Only a dentist can truly assess the health of your gums. It is important to keep up with cleanings and regular six-month checkups. Gum disease is a serious infection that can lead to tooth loss and compromised health if left untreated. These are some of the warning signs that should prompt you to see a dentist:

  • Tender, swollen or red gums
  • Bleeding while brushing or flossing
  • Gums pulling away from the teeth, which will make your teeth appear longer
  • Loose or separating teeth
  • Mouth sores or other pain
  • Persistent bad breath
  • A change in the way your teeth fit together when you bite

Changes Coming to Medicare Benefits in 2021

Like health insurance benefits, Medicare benefits can also change from year to year. Most of these changes tend to be minor, but for seniors who may be living on a fixed income it’s important to factor any Medicare rate changes into your budget planning.

So what can Medicare enrollees expect in the coming year?

New in 2021

Medicare premiums are recalculated annually with the changes going into effect on January 1 of the following year.

Medicare is primarily funded by payroll taxes, premiums, and federal budgets. With the coronavirus pandemic affecting the latter source, Medicare Part B premiums would spike in 2021 without Congressional intervention. Protecting enrollees from rising Medicare premiums is an issue that receives bipartisan support and is expected to be addressed in the next coronavirus relief package, or later this fall.

According to CNBC, “The idea is to protect Medicare’s 62.5 million beneficiaries — the majority of whom are age 65 or older — from a spike in Part B premiums due in part to reduced money flowing into the program from pandemic-related economic troubles.”

But while official rate changes haven’t been announced for the coming year and the state of the economy is in uncharted territory, industry experts are still able to make educated estimations on what changes may be forthcoming.

According to USA Today, “The standard Medicare Part B premium is expected to rise 2.7% (or $3.90) to $148.50 per month in 2021 from $144.60 per month in 2020.” Final rates should be announced in October of this year.

Protecting Your Savings

Medicare Supplemental insurance (also referred to as a Medigap policy) helps to fill in the “gap” in coverage between what Medicare Parts A and B cover and what you are forced to pay out of pocket.

If you or a loved one are turning 65 and have questions about your Medicare options a Medicare specialist may be able to help.

The Impact of COVID-19 on Group Health Planning and Renewals

This time last year we never suspected that wearing a face mask in public and social distancing would become part of our new normal. Concerts, festivals, and sporting events have been rescheduled or canceled, countless businesses have been forced to permanently close, and even Disney World temporarily shut their doors to the public.

With health and safety becoming a major focus this year for everyone, how can employers prepare for changes to the group health and benefits planning process?

Planning Your Benefits

To accurately plan your health benefits for next year, you’ll want to begin by identifying any trends or changes from this year. Here are a few questions you should be considering:

  • Have your claims gone up?
  • Have you lost employees?
  • Does your plan offer a low or no copay telemedicine product?
  • Is this the year you should consider a level-funded plan (which can save 10%-15% in premium costs)?
  • Do you have capabilities for employees to enroll online without having to collect paper forms?
  • Do you need to get even more creative with plan options and your contribution strategy?

Do you normally host enrollment meetings between your employees and broker agent? You may want to plan for virtual meetings this year assuming your agent has the ability.

Our team can offer expert advice, creative solutions, telemedicine, and best-in-class digital capabilities so you never need to collect paper enrollment forms again.

The Newness of the Virus

While plenty of data exists for viruses that have been around for decades, there just isn’t a lot of solid information on COVID-19 costs yet – which can make planning for the next year difficult. How long will the virus last? How much will treatment cost? Will there be any long-term health complications from the virus? These are the kinds of questions that the medical, healthcare and business communities don’t yet have answers to.

How to Work From Home With Pets

Millions of Americans are having to adjust to working remotely due to the COVID-19 pandemic. In addition to all the technological changes that has led to, it also means that you and your family have had to adjust to significant changes to your routines—including those involving your pet.

Pet owners should spend 1-2 hours (a day? a week?) with their cat or dog. But when working from home, you can expect that amount of time to increase. It’s important to develop a new sense of normal with your pet, without them expecting your complete attention during working hours.

So, what can you do to make sure you’re still able to be productive while working from home?

Start the Day Off on the Right Paw

When working from home, it may be tempting to sleep in without having to worry about the commute, but that extra time in the morning may be better spent with your pet. Providing food and playtime in the morning will help tire your pet and leave you with more time to work uninterrupted.

Redirect Attention

Have an upcoming call or task that will require your undivided attention and concentration? Be sure to attend to your pet’s needs in advance. Potty breaks, food and water, and toys can help keep your pet distracted and entertained without you (at least for a while).

Practice Positive Reinforcement

Has your coworker been good? Reinforce their good behavior with treats, their favorite toy, or some one-on-one playtime. As with any kind of training, it’s important to reward good behavior and work to improve the bad.

Keeping Your Pet Healthy

As of August 2020, only 20 dogs and cats have been positively diagnosed with COVD-19 in the United States. So while it is possible to pass the virus on to your pet, it appears to be far less contagious to animals than it is to humans.

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