interviewer and interviewee shaking hands post-interview process

Connecticut Adopts Salary History Inquiry Ban

New Law Effective January 1, 2019

Effective January 1, 2019, a new law generally prohibits Connecticut employers from inquiring about a prospective employee’s wage and salary history unless it is voluntarily disclosed. Notably, the law does not prohibit an employer from inquiring about other elements of a prospective employee’s compensation structure as long as such employer does not inquire about the value of the elements of such compensation structure.

Click here to read the law.

For more job application and interview compliance information, check out our Job Application & Interview Rules page for Connecticut.

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Vermont Adopts Salary History Inquiry Ban

New Law Effective July 1, 2018

Effective July 1, 2018, a new law prohibits Vermont employers from inquiring about or seeking an applicant’s salary history information­­, including information on his or her current or past wages, salary, bonuses, or benefits. The law also bans employers from relying on an applicant’s salary history information as a factor in determining whether to interview the applicant.

Notably, the law does not prohibit:

  • After making an offer of employment that includes compensation, confirming or requesting an applicant’s salary history information if the applicant previously disclosed the information voluntarily; or
  • Inquiring about an applicant’s salary expectations or requirements.

Click here to read the law.

For more job application and interview compliance information, check out our Job Application & Interview Rules page for Vermont.

young african american woman working in a bake shop

How Holiday Help May Impact Your ALE Status

Employers May Apply a Reasonable, Good Faith Interpretation of the Term ‘Seasonal Worker’

Employers that hire seasonal workers this holiday season are reminded that there is an exception when measuring workforce size to determine whether they are an applicable large employer (ALE) subject to the Affordable Care Act’s employer shared responsibility (“pay or play”) and corresponding information reporting provisions.

Seasonal Worker Exception

If an employer’s workforce exceeds 50 full-time employees (including full-time equivalent employees) for 120 days or less (or 4 calendar months) during the preceding calendar year, and the employees in excess of 50 who were employed during that period were seasonal workers, the employer is not considered an ALE for the current calendar year. A seasonal worker for this purpose is an employee who performs labor or services on a seasonal basis (e.g., retail workers employed exclusively during holiday seasons are seasonal workers).

Seasonal Worker Versus Seasonal Employee

While the terms “seasonal worker” and “seasonal employee” are both used in the pay or play provisions, only the term “seasonal worker” is relevant for determining whether an employer is considered an ALE. For this purpose, employers may apply a reasonable, good faith interpretation of the term “seasonal worker.” For more information on the difference between a seasonal worker and a seasonal employee under pay or play, please refer to IRS Pay or Play Q&A #26.

Check out our Pay or Play section for additional details.